Wind in Art, 1925

Great art, major art, is dependent upon wind. Granted authentic lyricism in two men in any art, the major poet differs from the minor in wind only. Call it endurance, perseverance, sustainment or what you will; I prefer wind.

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Carl Schmitt
The Artist is Particularly Unfit for Life (1925)

The artist is particularly unfit for life— too sensitive. Life’s lack of unity is heartbreaking to the artist. The artist is prone to yield to temptation to attempt to reform life instead of fleeing as he should to the imaginative life (art). As a reformer he is denying his gift of the gods and lowering himself.

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Carl Schmitt
Artist as Prophet, 1941

The artist has always been prophetic. The more naturalistic outlook of Masaccio, Cimabue, and Giotto presaged the humanism to come in the West: the painters had abandoned the rigidities of Byzantium long before the mass of mankind had accepted the comparative freedom of the Renaissance.

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Carl Schmitt
Room (with Bath) at the Inn, 1941

The breakdown here in America is not due to a negative evil like sin, but to avoidance alike of all negative and positive things like the virtues and vices in the hope that by postponing both heaven and hell long enough a Utopia of science may be discovered

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Carl Schmitt